My Experience with the Nomads Clinic

I’m with the Nomads Clinic under the auspices of the Upaya Zen Center based in NM under the direction of Roshi Joan Halifax who leads this Nepal trip. This is Roshi’s 19th year with Nomads and 39th year for trips and service work in Nepal. Roshi selects the western folks who comprise this trip. We number 26 made up of medical practitioners writers, photographers, artists, climbers and support team. We are in partnership with the Rinpoche from the Dolpo area and his high ranking Llamas. Together with Sunny Trek Co of Nepal made up of staff and countless horses and mules we head out on our adventure. Suffice it to say I’m honored to share and participate in such an extraordinary group of people. After a myriad of travel delays due to hurricane activity we all made it to Kathmandu. Our pre trek event was to host a clinic for the Rohingya refugees at one of their camps. We arrived and learned more of their culture, challenges and need. I was in charge of providing an art experience for the children of the camp. My sister Leslie and I had planned our project in the states so we were ready with supplies, support and approach. The children are stunningly beautiful and all ages joined. They wanted only to be with us and create there was no rush. We celebrated them and invited each to draw and create something about themselves or their community that they value. Renderings of place, love, and family dominated. Some also drew the boats that brought them to Nepal. Quite meaningful and profound. We connected their images with unbroken lines to create community and hung their art as a mural outside for all to see. During this process there was a teenage girl who shyly indicated she would like to participate. She was beautiful and talented inside and out and grasped the concepts immediately and she was the one to connect and create community with her line drawings. At the end she could not come out of her home per her cultural customs. As I was cleaning up her mother came into the art room and tried a few of the supplies and then the two of them proceeded to share their own experience oblivious of my presence but I’m grateful to have witnessed their homes or the camp without escort and they do not speak Nepali. Their children receive education 1st to 8th grade. The Rohingya have little access, rights or opportunities as refugees and the women live the culture of not leaving.

– Amy MacDonald

Watch the Trailer

Brolly Arts in partnership with Black Storytellers of Utah, Black Social Change Utah Documentary participants, and, Marian Dora Howe-Taylor have been working on a multi-disciplinary project, Black Social Change Utah (BSCU): Preserving the Story, Changing The Future. BSCU came about in response to growing awareness, questions and experiences of racism in Utah. The project invites us to celebrate, listen to, view and learn from Black leaders, artists and social change agents in our community.

By creating awareness and developing a greater understanding of the Black experience in Utah we will expose the undercurrent of unacknowledged and silent racial inequality. The documentary BSCU integrates haunting and hopeful narratives, film, soulful spirituals, choreography, dance and theater to bring to life the forgotten and unknown stories that need to be heard in order for our community to reconcile and grow. The film guides viewers to open their hearts to what it feels like to maintain “hope” again and again in the face of unsolicited adversity. Themes of education, resilience, and faith propel the film unwrapping the key to a culture whose very foundation is built upon a forged resiliency and grace.

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We Need Your Help

Brolly Arts in partnership with Black Storytellers of Utah, Black Social Change Utah Documentary participants, and, Marian Dora Howe-Taylor have been working on a multi-disciplinary project, Black Social Change in Utah (BSCU): Preserving the Story. BSCU came about in response to growing awareness, questions and experiences of racism in Utah. The project invites us to celebrate, listen to, view and learn from Black leaders, artists and social change agents in our community who believe that change, such as attaining equality, is possible.  The result is the creation of the BSCU documentary with outreach programming to follow. DONATE NOW

The documentary BSCU integrates haunting and hopeful narratives, film, soulful spirituals, choreography and theater to bring to life the forgotten and unknown stories that need to be heard in order for our community to reconcile and grow. The film guides viewers to open their hearts to what it feels like to maintain “hope” again and again in the face of unsolicited adversity. Themes of education, resilience, and faith propel the film unwrapping the key to a culture whose very foundation is built upon a forged resiliency and grace.

Brolly Arts is dedicated to creating meaningful art and vibrant communities through artistic and civic collaboration and experimentation. As a non-profit umbrella organization, Brolly Arts is committed to increasing the opportunities and impacts of artists and arts organizations in Utah.

Please join us in creating awareness and developing a greater understanding of the Black experience in Utah in an attempt to expose and address the undercurrent of unseen and silent racial inequality.

Warm regards,

Amy MacDonald
Founder and Director
Brolly Arts

Watch Black Social Change Teaser Videos

 

 
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To Pay By Check
Make Checks Payable to: Brolly Arts
Mailing Address:
Brolly Arts c/o Marian Howe-Taylor
Black Storytellers of Utah
P. O. Box 874
Layton, Utah 84040

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Black Social Change: Preserving The Story Press Release

Brolly Arts, Salt Lake Community College, and Rowland Hall Present Black Social Change: Preserving The Story

January 15, 2016 at 6:30pm in the Larimer Center at Rowland Hall (843 South Lincoln Street)

Are race relations in Utah so misunderstood that Utahns don’t understand the blatant racism experienced and reinforced everyday? Is Utah behind understanding the impact of skin color in our community?  Is it the responsibility of a community to identify harmful blind spots in our cultural competency and bring them into view?

Help us celebrate, listen to, and learn from Black leaders, artists, and social change agents in our community. Black Social Change (BSC) is a multidisciplinary event integrating haunting and hopeful narratives, film, soulful spirituals performed by Lyric Baritone Robert Sims of Chicago, as well as choreography and theater performed by local dancers and choreographers Sofia Gorder and Notasha Washington.

This performing arts event is in collaboration with and in celebration of the documentary “Black Social Change: Preserving The Story,” that will premiere at Salt Lake Community College Grand Theatre, 1575 South State Salt Lake City on Tuesday January 19, 2015 at 7:00 p.m.

This event brings to life the forgotten and unknown stories that need to be heard in order for our community to reconcile and grow. The event guides viewers to open their hearts to what it feels like to maintain “hope” again and again in the face of unsolicited adversity. Themes of education, resilience, and faith propel the evening’s performances unwrapping the key to a culture whose very foundation is built upon a forged resiliency and grace.  Join us in creating awareness and developing a greater understanding of the Black experience in Utah in attempt to expose the undercurrent of unseen and silent racial inequality. The performance begins in the Larimer Center at Rowland Hall at 6:30pm and will be followed by dessert and dialogue in the cafeteria.

Inland / Outland : Utah Press Release

INLAND/OUTLAND: VISUAL & MUSICAL JOURNEY THROUGH UTAH’S VARIED LANDSCAPES

Salt Lake City, UT: Brolly Arts presents in conjunction with Salt Lake Public Library and Utah Museum of Contemporary Art (UMOCA) Inland / Oultand: Utah, a multi-disciplinary project featuring Icelandic visual artist Svavar Jonatansson (from Academy Award winning documentary Chasing Ice), and Utah composers Devin Maxwell and Matthew Durant. The collaboration has resulted in four short films composed of tens of thousands of still photographs from four areas of Utah: Salt Flats (I-80), Arches National Park  (Arches Scenic Drive), Capitol Reef (State Route 24) and  Oljato Road. Each film has an original score bringing the videos to life with the dialogue and interplay between the two art forms. The intent is to offer a unique presentation of these places that  invites the audience to view them through their own lens of experience, story and identity.

Jonatansson tediously photographed the landscapes under a variety of conditions: sometimes stark, bleak, and icy and other times vibrant and optimistic. By presenting Utah through the lenses of an ever-changing landscape, a playful form emerges which is amplified musically through careful presentation and transformation of compact musical cells. The beauty lies in the management of the dialogue between the score and the landscape. Jonatansson, Maxwell and Durrant have created an effective, engaging work that captures the wide range of possible emotions locked inside a long unvaried drive.

The Inland/Outland project started in 2007 in Iceland when Jónatansson travelled around the island’s 900 mile ring in freight trucks and buses, photographing out the side windows every 4-7 seconds. Utah-based composers, Maxwell and Durrant began collaborating with Jonatansson in early 2012, when he began Inland / Outland : Utah. Brolly Arts joined the growing project in early 2013. In October of 2013, the work thus far was previewed at the symposium Critical Rediscovery of the Northern Rockies at the College of Art and Architecture at Montana State University. The widespread enthusiasm and support of the work leads now to the premiere of these works at UMOCA and the photographic exhibit of these places at the Salt Lake Public Library.

The photographic exhibit runs August 9th to September 12th at the Salt Lake Public Library with a reception on Saturday, August 9th from 4–5:30pm.

The Utah premier is August 15th at UMOCA at 7pm. Tickets are $15 – $20.

About Brolly Arts: Founded in 1995, Brolly Arts is a non-profit organization dedicated to creating meaningful art and vibrant communities through artistic and civic collaboration and experimentation.  Brolly Art’s mission is reaching a wider audience and creating links between the public, arts and landscape that contribute to sense of place, identity and community.